dr-gavin-clarkson

Dr. Gavin Clarkson

Dr. Gavin Clarkson is an associate professor in the Finance Department of the College of Business at New Mexico State University where he teaches business courses as well as Federal Indian Law and Policy. He is also on the Entrepreneurship faculty in the Graduate School of Business at Rice University. An enrolled member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, Dr. Clarkson has consulted, written, and published extensively on tribal finance and economic development and has conducted significant research on the empirical data on Indian mascots. Dr. Clarkson was also a contributing author for the most recent edition of Felix Cohen’s Handbook of Federal Indian Law, providing material on tribal finance, economic development, and intellectual property.

In 2005, Dr. Clarkson received the first ever grant from the National Science Foundation to study the dynamics of tribal finance. His research and Congressional testimony on tribal access to the capital markets helped lead to the inclusion of $2B of Tribal Economic Development Bonds in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. He is a lifetime member of the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) and was Chairman of the AISES Foundation from 2005 until 2009.

Dr. Clarkson holds both a bachelor's degree and an MBA from Rice University, a doctorate from the Harvard Business School in Technology and Operations Management, and is a cum laude graduate of the Harvard Law School, where he was the managing editor of the Harvard Journal of Law and Technology and president of the Native American Law Students Association.

Dr. Clarkson was on the Computer Science faculty at Rice University from 1991 until 1998 and was a KPMG Fellow at the Harvard Business School from 1998 until 2003. While at Harvard, he was also the John M. Olin Research Fellow in Law, Economics, and Business, the Reginald F. Lewis Fellow for Law Teaching, and held a university-wide fellowship, the 1665 Harvard University Native American Program Fellowship. From 2003 until 2008, Dr. Clarkson was an assistant professor in the School of Information at the University of Michigan, with simultaneous appointments at the Law School and in Native American Studies, where he grew the Indian Law program from five students in 2003 to more than sixty by 2008. He was on the faculty at the University of Houston Law Center from 2008 to 2012, and the Summer Indian Law faculty at the University of Montana Law School.

Dr. Clarkson holds the Series 7, Series 24, and Series 66 Securities licenses from the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA). He has helped tribes raise more than $700 million for tribal governmental and entrepreneurial enterprises using a variety of financial mechanisms including taxable and tax-exempt bonds, bank credit facilities, and New Markets Tax Credits.

Selected Articles

Clarkson, G., Spilde, K., Online Sovereignty: The Law and Economics of Tribal Electronic Commerce 19 Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment & Technology Law 1 (2016)

Clarkson, G., Murphy, A., Tribal Leakage: How the Curse of Trust Land Impedes Tribal Economic Self-Sustainability, 12.2 Journal of Law, Economics and Policy 31 (2016)

Clarkson, G., Sebenius, J., Leveraging Tribal Sovereignty for Economic Opportunity: A Strategic Negotiations Perspective, 76 Missouri L. Rev. 1045 (2012)

Accredited Indians: Increasing the Flow of Private Equity into Indian Country as a Domestic Emerging Market, 80 Colorado L Rev. 285 (2009)

Wall Street Indians: Information Asymmetry and Barriers to Tribal Capital Market Access. 12 Lewis and Clark Law Review 943 (2008)

Capital and Finance Issues in Tribal Economic Development, Proceedings of the National Native American Economic Policy Summit, May 15, 2007, National Congress of American Indians

Tribal Bonds: Statutory Shackles and Regulatory Restraints on Tribal Economic Development, 85 N.C. L. Rev. 1009 (2007)

Racial Imagery and Native Americans: A First Look at the Empirical Evidence Behind the Indian Mascot Controversy, 11 Cardozo J. Int’l & Comp. L. 393 (2003)